CJS e-Newsletter 2022: The Year in Review

Welcome to the 2022 Centre for Japanese Studies e-Newsletter. This year for many has been one of reconnecting with friends, partners and colleagues, while also finding our way in the post-pandemic world. 2022 saw the return to in-person events – for CJS, this began with our spring reception following the Sasakawa Postgraduate Studentship workshop inContinue reading “CJS e-Newsletter 2022: The Year in Review”

CJS Research Webinar: Transcultural Dynamics in Memory Literature of Japanese- and Lithuanian-speaking Prisoners of War and Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union

Join us on Thursday 24th November for the next online instalment of our CJS Research Seminar series with Gunde Dauksyte.

CJS Research Webinar – Asia-Pacific Tensions: Japan, China and the Taiwan flashpoint, military capabilities, deterrence – Ways to conceptualize and measure them

Join us on Thursday 27th October for a hybrid session of our CJS Research Seminar series with András Bartók.

[S2E30] 🏛️ Discovering Museums with Sophie Richard

Oliver is joined by Sophie Richard, art historian, museum specialist and acclaimed writer, as we explore art museums in Japan of every variety. From her training at École du Louvre, Sophie has visited museums across the archipelago, broadening her understanding of what a museum can be and inspiring her to write a book on capturing this for the non-Japanese speaking art lover.

[S2E29] 🚔 Crime & Desistance with Adam Hunt

Oliver is joined by Adam Hunt, PhD candidate at the University of Sheffield, to compare crime between Japan and the UK and how factors such as attitudes towards former convicts affects “desistance”; that is, attempts to reduce the rate of reoffending.

[S2E1] 👂 Reinterpreting Difficult Heritage: Mimizuka, “Hill of Ears” with Oliver Moxham

Welcome back to the second series of Beyond Japan! This week the tables are turned as Professor Simon Kaner, Director of the Sainsbury Institute, interviews host Oliver Moxham on the topic of his recently completed master’s thesis, Reinterpreting Difficult Heritage.

Disaster Tourism in Fukushima: Respectful or Dark?

In Oliver’s Friday Food For Thought, he wrote of a call from some Fukushima residents to turn ruins of the tsunami into a heritage site, similar to the Genbaku Dome in Hiroshima. The disaster should certainly be remembered, but what is the right way to do so? In 2018, CNN described Fukushima’s tourism “comeback”, citingContinue reading “Disaster Tourism in Fukushima: Respectful or Dark?”